Brink of agreement

UN climate chief Yvo de Boer has said he thinks we are on the brink of agreement to a Bali roadmap. This does not imply an early finish. When pushed on the time issue by journalists desperate to squeeze in a bite to eat, Mr de Boer acknowledged talks were likely to carry on throughout the night.

His spokesman John Hay confirmed a nasty rumour that UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon is due to return to Bali – he’s presently elsewhere – for a final address at 11am on Saturday morning. “He has to come back here anyway for a refuelling stop,” added Mr Hay but even he did not look like he believed this.

So we’re here for the night. It’s just after midnight and the press room is a lively place. During his last update, Mr de Boer provided a useful progress report. The primary outstanding issue remains how to word the long term climate ambitions and mitigation goals for developed and developing countries.

Conclusions on adaptation, financing and deforestation have all been agreed, save for some language linking them to mitigation. They join technology transfer, which was agreed last night. Details of a review of the Kyoto protocol have also been agreed.

This means it’s down to settling the ambition and mitigation text. Once that’s done, ministers will have to decide whether to launch formal negotiations and by when they want them to finish. They are expected to do so and set a 2009 end date. Assuming all this goes ahead as planned, what will the new agreement be called asked one journalist?

Mr de Boer added this to his to-do list. The document is currently entitled “consolidated text prepared by the co-facilitators”.

But all may not go as smoothly as this. At a press conference earlier in the day Munir Akram, chairman of the G77 and China group, told journalists developing countries were being threatened with trade sanctions to sign up to “commitments and obligations” on mitigation:

“The G77 has no obligation under the [UN] convention to accept binding targets,” he emphasised, “our measures will be voluntary, they’ll be national, and they’ll be in the context of sustainable development.”

munir-001.jpg

Mr Akram said developing countries had faced an uphill battle in Bali and it had proved “extremely difficult” to secure a commitment from developed countries, especially the US, to enhanced mitigation efforts in future. He stressed several times that the priority for developing countries was to see full implementation of the existing UN climate convention and Kyoto protocol, not a sidelining of these by a new agreement.

Mr de Boer responded he was not aware of anyone having been threatened, but emphasised that the issues at stake went to the very heart of economic policy and tensions were running high.

The G77 and China chairman predicted negotiations would continue for “a few hours at least”. That’s proved optimistic. Ministers in the small working group dedicated to ambition and mitigation were due to report back to the main body of ministers at midnight. In the meantime it’s 1:20am and there’s still no sign of them.

I heard a few minutes ago the final plenary session is provisionally planned for 8am. Some are calling even that optimistic. As the trickle of information has dried up, journalists – including me – have started hanging around the coffee bar outside the locked meeting room, occasionally mobbing someone when they emerge.

A few are considering going home to sleep. That seems a shame after a week of build-up. But not as incredible as one Dutch journalist who apparently flew home today because he figured he could report on the final details from behind his own desk.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: